Posts tagged "new york"

Charles “Tarzan” Cooper, shown circa 1939, was a member of the New York Rens basketball team - one of the first all-Black basketball teams in the United States. All-Black teams existed up until around 1950 when the NBA integrated their teams The New-York Historical Society is sponsoring a scholarship contest that was inspired by their upcoming exhibition on The Black Fives, which is about the history of early 20th-century African American basketball teams. Photo: The Black Fives Foundation/New York Historical Society.

#VBGicon Josephine Baker strikes a pose in her dressing room on March 6, 1951 at the Strand Theater in New York City. Photo: AP.

#VBGicon Josephine Baker strikes a pose in her dressing room on March 6, 1951 at the Strand Theater in New York City. Photo: AP.

Percy Verwayne (1895-1968) was the original Sportin’ Life in the 1927 Broadway DuBose and Dorothy Heyward play, “Porgy,” the precursor to the iconic 1935 George Gershwin opera “Porgy and Bess.” Mr. Verwayne was born in British Guiana (now Guyana) and appeared on Broadway, on radio and in several films for at least thirty years, but he was best known in his day for originating the role of Sportin’ Life. He was also a former athlete and that came in handy in 1941 when he was robbed of 75 cents by a very unwise 18-year-old within two blocks of his Harlem home at 400 West 128th street. The incident was gleefully reported in the New York Amsterdam News on August 9, 1941 under the headline, “Mugger Gets Wrong Victim.” According to the paper, when the mugger tried to run away, “Verwayne chased him for a block, grabbed him by the seat of his trousers and socked him into submission. When the cops arrived, Verwayne was in complete control of the situation.” I’ll bet he was… haha! Photo: New York Public Library, Billy Rose Theater Collection.

Percy Verwayne (1895-1968) was the original Sportin’ Life in the 1927 Broadway DuBose and Dorothy Heyward play, “Porgy,” the precursor to the iconic 1935 George Gershwin opera “Porgy and Bess.” Mr. Verwayne was born in British Guiana (now Guyana) and appeared on Broadway, on radio and in several films for at least thirty years, but he was best known in his day for originating the role of Sportin’ Life. He was also a former athlete and that came in handy in 1941 when he was robbed of 75 cents by a very unwise 18-year-old within two blocks of his Harlem home at 400 West 128th street. The incident was gleefully reported in the New York Amsterdam News on August 9, 1941 under the headline, “Mugger Gets Wrong Victim.” According to the paper, when the mugger tried to run away, “Verwayne chased him for a block, grabbed him by the seat of his trousers and socked him into submission. When the cops arrived, Verwayne was in complete control of the situation.” I’ll bet he was… haha! Photo: New York Public Library, Billy Rose Theater Collection.

Eartha Kitt, one of the reasons Vintage Black Glamour exists, was born 86 years ago today in North, South Carolina. In this photograph, she is shown at a cast party for “Leonard Sillman’s New Faces of 1952,” the show where she made her Broadway debut and sang, for the first time, her classic song, “Monotonous.” Photo: Museum of the City of New York

Lorraine Hansberry is captured by Gordon Parks chatting with the pianist at a party in honor of her play ‘A Raisin in the Sun,’ at the now legendary Manhattan restaurant, Sardi’s in March 1959. Photo: Gordon Parks/Time Life Pictures/Getty Images.

Lorraine Hansberry is captured by Gordon Parks chatting with the pianist at a party in honor of her play ‘A Raisin in the Sun,’ at the now legendary Manhattan restaurant, Sardi’s in March 1959. Photo: Gordon Parks/Time Life Pictures/Getty Images.

Nina Simone in her dressing room at the Village Gate in Manhattan before a live recording session in March 1965. Photo by Sam Falk/New York Times Co./Getty Images.

Nina Simone in her dressing room at the Village Gate in Manhattan before a live recording session in March 1965. Photo by Sam Falk/New York Times Co./Getty Images.

Janet Collins, the first Black prima ballerina at The Metropolitan Opera in her dressing room on the night of her debut, November 11, 1951. Ms. Collins, a cousin of Carmen de Lavallade, performed Giuseppe Verdi’s “Aida” that night. She died in 2003 at the age of 86.

Janet Collins, the first Black prima ballerina at The Metropolitan Opera in her dressing room on the night of her debut, November 11, 1951. Ms. Collins, a cousin of Carmen de Lavallade, performed Giuseppe Verdi’s “Aida” that night. She died in 2003 at the age of 86.