Posts tagged "memorialday"

Lena Horne with a group of Tuskegee Airmen on January 1, 1945. There are countless photos of Ms. Horne visiting Tuskegee Airmen and other military personnel to show her support for their service. She also showed her support for them by refusing to perform for segregated military audiences during World War II. Photo: Associated Press.

A “Double V” campaign celebration in 1942 on 119th Street, between Lenox and 7th (now Malcolm X Blvd and Adam Clayton Powell Blvd) in Harlem. The Double V campaign was started in 1942, just as World War II began, by the Pittsburgh Courier, an historic African-American newspaper. “Double V” stood for “Victory Abroad and Victory at Home” and the purpose was to call continued attention to the legal injustices and segregation that Blacks dealt with as American citizens on American soil and as soldiers abroad within the (segregated) armed forces. To appreciate the role of the Pittsburgh Courier in this campaign, keep in mind that white newspapers did not cover Blacks unless there was a crime involved or, of course, if the Black in question was an athlete or an entertainer. White newspapers did not cover our births, deaths, weddings or any other slice of life-type activity that we did just like everyone else. That is why, in part, Ebony magazine was born. And they certainly did not report on racial discrimination (especially within the military where Black newspapers were banned from its libraries during the Double V Campaign) the way the Black press did.

A model supporting The “Double V” Campaign during World War II. “Double V” stood for “Victory Abroad and Victory at Home.” The purpose of the campaign, which was started by The Pittsburgh Courier, an historic Black newspaper) was to call attention to continuous legal injustices that Blacks dealt with as American citizens on American soil and as soldiers abroad within the (segregated) armed forces. To support the campaign, Black women wore Double Vs on their dresses and wore a hairstyle called the “doubler” — two Vs in their hair.

A model supporting The “Double V” Campaign during World War II. “Double V” stood for “Victory Abroad and Victory at Home.” The purpose of the campaign, which was started by The Pittsburgh Courier, an historic Black newspaper) was to call attention to continuous legal injustices that Blacks dealt with as American citizens on American soil and as soldiers abroad within the (segregated) armed forces. To support the campaign, Black women wore Double Vs on their dresses and wore a hairstyle called the “doubler” — two Vs in their hair.

Col. Benjamin O. Davis and Edward C. Gleed in Ramitelli, Italy in March 1945. Col. Davis was the Commanding Officer of the 332nd Fighter Group - the Tuskegee Airmen. Mr. Gleed was Group Operations Officer. P-5/D, “Creamer’s Dream,” is in the background.

Photo by Toni Frissell.