Posts tagged "lit"

Did you know that you can get a sneak peak at my new book? When you go to http://vintageblackglamourbook.com/ click the big red “Look Inside” button to get an idea of what you will be getting in June. This page features Princess Kouka of Sudan (Paul Robeson’s 1930s co-star) and the legendary dancer Jeni LeGon.

I am so excited to announce that my book, Vintage Black Glamour, is now available for pre-order! It will be published in June by Rocket 88 Books and if you were an early-bird and registered, you should be getting an email shortly with a special ‘thank you’ deal that is exclusive to you. Pre-ordering today means that your credit card will be charged immediately and you will receive the book upon publication in June. Also, If you pre-order by March 15th your name will be printed in the book in The Roll of Honour (see the site for more details). Thank you again! 

Langston Hughes was born 112 years ago today in Joplin, Missouri. This photo was taken by Nickolas Muray, a Hungarian-American photographer who was also an Olympic fencer, in 1923 when Mr. Hughes was about 21 years old.

Langston Hughes was born 112 years ago today in Joplin, Missouri. This photo was taken by Nickolas Muray, a Hungarian-American photographer who was also an Olympic fencer, in 1923 when Mr. Hughes was about 21 years old.

Zora Neale Hurston was born 123 years ago today, January 7, 1891 in Notasulga, Alabama and raised in the legendary all-black town of Eatonville, Florida. She made the following observation in her 1950 essay, What White Publishers Won’t Print. ”For various reasons, the average, struggling, non-morbid Negro is the best-kept secret in America. His revelation to the public is the thing needed to do away with that feeling of difference which inspires fear, and which ever expresses itself in dislike. It is inevitable that this knowledge will destroy many illusions and romantic traditions which America probably likes to have around. But then, we have no record of anybody sinking into a lingering death on finding out that there was no Santa Claus. The old world will take it in its stride. The realization that Negroes are no better nor no worse, and at times just as bonny as everybody else, will hardly kill off the population of the nation.” This rare color photograph of Ms. Hurston was taken by Carl Van Vechten in 1940. Photo: Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library

Two icons: Billie Holiday and William Faulkner, photographed in 1956 by Moneta Sleet Jr. According to Donald Clarke’s 2009 biography on Ms. Holiday, she was initially wary about meeting Mr. Faulkner because he was a Southerner. She called her friend, the singer Thelma Carpenter (best known in later years as “Miss One” from “The Wiz” and asked about him. Ms. Carpenter said that the meeting was likely set up by Bill Dufty, her ghostwriter for “Lady Sings the Blues” and that the singer and the writer “got along beautifully… he understood her perfectly.” Photo: Moneta Sleet Jr./Ebony/Art.com.

Two icons: Billie Holiday and William Faulkner, photographed in 1956 by Moneta Sleet Jr. According to Donald Clarke’s 2009 biography on Ms. Holiday, she was initially wary about meeting Mr. Faulkner because he was a Southerner. She called her friend, the singer Thelma Carpenter (best known in later years as “Miss One” from “The Wiz” and asked about him. Ms. Carpenter said that the meeting was likely set up by Bill Dufty, her ghostwriter for “Lady Sings the Blues” and that the singer and the writer “got along beautifully… he understood her perfectly.” Photo: Moneta Sleet Jr./Ebony/Art.com.

I am happy to announce that Vintage Black Glamour - THE BOOK! -  is scheduled to be published in Spring 2014!  Starting today, you can register your interest in the book (registering is different from pre-ordering, which will be available starting early February) at vintageblackglamourbook.com. My publisher is Rocket 88 an imprint of London-based Essential Works, and after you register, you will be contacted by email in early 2014 with further details about the book and, if you wish, you may pre-order at that time. Once again, thank you so much! ~ Nichelle Gainer

Dorothy Porter Wesley (1905-1995) photographed by Carl Van Vechten on May 23, 1951. Ms. Porter Wesley was the curator of the Moorland-Spingarn Research Center at Howard University for forty-three years and played the leading role in building its collection. The crucial, tireless work performed by Ms. Porter Wesley is still having an impact on history and literary studies today. In 1948, she noticed a manuscript that was said to have been written by a female fugitive slave at a New York City bookseller and purchased it for $85. In 2001, Professor Henry Louis Gates bought it at auction for $8,500 and it became the bestselling book, "The Bondwoman’s Narrative" by Hannah Crafts. Earlier this week, Professor Gregg Hecimovich of Winthrop University in Rock Hill, S.C., revealed that he has discovered the real identity of the author. Hannah Crafts was really Hannah Bond, a slave on a North Carolina plantation before she disguised herself as a man and escaped. Photo: Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library

Dorothy Porter Wesley (1905-1995) photographed by Carl Van Vechten on May 23, 1951. Ms. Porter Wesley was the curator of the Moorland-Spingarn Research Center at Howard University for forty-three years and played the leading role in building its collection. The crucial, tireless work performed by Ms. Porter Wesley is still having an impact on history and literary studies today. In 1948, she noticed a manuscript that was said to have been written by a female fugitive slave at a New York City bookseller and purchased it for $85. In 2001, Professor Henry Louis Gates bought it at auction for $8,500 and it became the bestselling book, "The Bondwoman’s Narrative" by Hannah Crafts. Earlier this week, Professor Gregg Hecimovich of Winthrop University in Rock Hill, S.C., revealed that he has discovered the real identity of the author. Hannah Crafts was really Hannah Bond, a slave on a North Carolina plantation before she disguised herself as a man and escaped. Photo: Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library