Posts tagged "illustration"

A Night Club Map of Harlem, illustrated by the legendary cartoonist E. Simms Campbell in 1932. Cab Calloway narrates an animation of the map in Cab Calloway: Sketches” on PBS’s American Masters


Pioneering cartoonist Zelda “Jackie” Ormes. Born to a well-to-do family in Pittsburgh in 1911, Ormes created popular cartoon and comics series like Torchy Brown and Candy, that appeared in African American newspapers like the Pittsburgh Courier and the Chicago Defender from 1937 to 1956.  Her cartoon Patty-Jo ‘n Ginger inspired the creation of the Patty-Jo doll, an upscale, brown-skinned doll that was a direct contrast to the black dolls of the day that depicted black children as raggedy “picaninnies.”  Jackie Ormes herself said, “No more… Sambos… Just KIDS!“ 

I encourage you to pick up Nancy Goldstein’s wonderful book, Jackie Ormes: The First African-American Woman Cartoonist, to learn even more about Ms. Ormes. According to Ms. Goldstein, people who knew Jackie Ormes say that she modeled some of her characters after herself, beautifully dressed and outspoken about issues of the day. Ms. Ormes was one of many artists who were investigated by the House of Un-American activities during the McCarthy era. She also led a very full, interesting social life in Chicago and was friendly with celebrities like Eartha Kitt and Duke Ellington. She died in 1985.

Pioneering cartoonist Zelda “Jackie” Ormes. Born to a well-to-do family in Pittsburgh in 1911, Ormes created popular cartoon and comics series like Torchy Brown and Candy, that appeared in African American newspapers like the Pittsburgh Courier and the Chicago Defender from 1937 to 1956.  Her cartoon Patty-Jo ‘n Ginger inspired the creation of the Patty-Jo doll, an upscale, brown-skinned doll that was a direct contrast to the black dolls of the day that depicted black children as raggedy “picaninnies.”  Jackie Ormes herself said, “No more… Sambos… Just KIDS!“ 

I encourage you to pick up Nancy Goldstein’s wonderful book, Jackie Ormes: The First African-American Woman Cartoonist, to learn even more about Ms. Ormes. According to Ms. Goldstein, people who knew Jackie Ormes say that she modeled some of her characters after herself, beautifully dressed and outspoken about issues of the day. Ms. Ormes was one of many artists who were investigated by the House of Un-American activities during the McCarthy era. She also led a very full, interesting social life in Chicago and was friendly with celebrities like Eartha Kitt and Duke Ellington. She died in 1985.

Invaluable 1953 newsreel footage of cartoonist Jackie Ormes at her desk drawing and showing off the Patty-Jo doll she created. 

One more Patty-Jo ‘n Ginger comic by Jackie Ormes. The caption reads: “Gosh—Thanks if you’re beggin’ for me—But how’s about getting our rich Uncle Sam to put good public schools all over so we can be trained fit for any college?” 

From Jackie Ormes: The First African American Woman Cartoonist:
June 26, 1948: In Ginger’s right hand is a fund-raising instruction booklet titled “Negro College Fund” and falling to the floor are cards that say “Pledge.” The United Negro College Fund started four years earlier to help finance such private schools as Tuskegee and Howard universities. Patty-Jo points out the injustice of substandard schools for children who live in the poorer black neighborhoods and argues for federal assistance. To be sure, this cartoon brings a serious message to the funny pages. But it would have been enjoyed for its satirical thrust, especially since the spokesperson is an unlikely one, a child as truth-teller, declaiming on a topic beyond her years.

One more Patty-Jo ‘n Ginger comic by Jackie Ormes. The caption reads: “Gosh—Thanks if you’re beggin’ for me—But how’s about getting our rich Uncle Sam to put good public schools all over so we can be trained fit for any college?”
 

From Jackie Ormes: The First African American Woman Cartoonist:

June 26, 1948: In Ginger’s right hand is a fund-raising instruction booklet titled “Negro College Fund” and falling to the floor are cards that say “Pledge.” The United Negro College Fund started four years earlier to help finance such private schools as Tuskegee and Howard universities. Patty-Jo points out the injustice of substandard schools for children who live in the poorer black neighborhoods and argues for federal assistance. To be sure, this cartoon brings a serious message to the funny pages. But it would have been enjoyed for its satirical thrust, especially since the spokesperson is an unlikely one, a child as truth-teller, declaiming on a topic beyond her years.

“Patty-Jo ‘n Ginger,” a 1940s comic strip by Jackie Ormes, a rare female cartoonist of the day. The cartoon depicted middle class Patty Jo and her little sister Ginger in various slice-of-life situations - a sharp contrast to persistent negative images that often appeared in the media. “Patty-Jo ‘n Ginger” began appearing exclusively in the Pittsburgh Courier in 1946.

Patty-Jo ‘n Ginger,” a 1940s comic strip by Jackie Ormes, a rare female cartoonist of the day. The cartoon depicted middle class Patty Jo and her little sister Ginger in various slice-of-life situations - a sharp contrast to persistent negative images that often appeared in the media. “Patty-Jo ‘n Ginger” began appearing exclusively in the Pittsburgh Courier in 1946.

Cartoonist Jackie Ormes (1911-1985) was a true pioneer. She worked with legendary Black American newspapers like the Chicago Defender and the Pittsburgh Courier during the 1940s and 1950s when female cartoonists were practically nonexistent. I urge you to pick up Nancy Goldstein’s wonderful book, Jackie Ormes: The First African-American Woman Cartoonist, as Ms. Ormes was truly a fascinating woman. 

Cartoonist Jackie Ormes (1911-1985) was a true pioneer. She worked with legendary Black American newspapers like the Chicago Defender and the Pittsburgh Courier during the 1940s and 1950s when female cartoonists were practically nonexistent. I urge you to pick up Nancy Goldstein’s wonderful book, Jackie Ormes: The First African-American Woman Cartoonist, as Ms. Ormes was truly a fascinating woman. 

One more Patty-Jo ‘n Ginger comic by Jackie Ormes. The caption reads: “Gosh—Thanks if you’re beggin’ for me—But how’s about getting our rich Uncle Sam to put good public schools all over so we can be trained fit for any college?”
From Jackie Ormes: The First African American Woman Cartoonist:
June 26, 1948: In Ginger’s right hand is a fund-raising instruction booklet titled “Negro College Fund” and falling to the floor are cards that say “Pledge.” The United Negro College Fund started four years earlier to help finance such private schools as Tuskegee and Howard universities. Patty-Jo points out the injustice of substandard schools for children who live in the poorer black neighborhoods and argues for federal assistance. To be sure, this cartoon brings a serious message to the funny pages. But it would have been enjoyed for its satirical thrust, especially since the spokesperson is an unlikely one, a child as truth-teller, declaiming on a topic beyond her years.

One more Patty-Jo ‘n Ginger comic by Jackie Ormes. The caption reads: “Gosh—Thanks if you’re beggin’ for me—But how’s about getting our rich Uncle Sam to put good public schools all over so we can be trained fit for any college?”

From Jackie Ormes: The First African American Woman Cartoonist:

June 26, 1948: In Ginger’s right hand is a fund-raising instruction booklet titled “Negro College Fund” and falling to the floor are cards that say “Pledge.” The United Negro College Fund started four years earlier to help finance such private schools as Tuskegee and Howard universities. Patty-Jo points out the injustice of substandard schools for children who live in the poorer black neighborhoods and argues for federal assistance. To be sure, this cartoon brings a serious message to the funny pages. But it would have been enjoyed for its satirical thrust, especially since the spokesperson is an unlikely one, a child as truth-teller, declaiming on a topic beyond her years.