Posts tagged "history"

I really believe you are going to faint when you see the gorgeous photos I have of Margot Webb and her dance partner, Harold Norton, in Vintage Black Glamour. Their photos only tell part of their story. Their undeniable elegance turned out to be a blessing – and a curse for their career. You’ll read more about it in the book, but Ms. Webb herself told the dance scholar Brenda Dixon-Gottschild that dwindling opportunities solidified her decision to return to school. After her dance days were long gone, she earned a bachelor’s degree at Hunter College in 1940 and a master’s degree in education from Columbia University Teachers College in 1948.

The brilliant dancer, choreographer and activist, Katherine Dunham (1909-2006), performing her work, “Afrique,” circa 1962. Ms. Dunham formed Ballet Nègre, one of the first black ballet companies in the United States in 1930 and, along with African dance, studied dances from Jamaica, Trinidad and Haiti as a part of her anthropological fieldwork. She studied at Northwestern University and the University of Chicago, where she earned a bachelor’s degree in anthropology in 1936. Photo: Roger Wood, New York Public Library for the Performing Arts

Dorothy Dandridge presenting the Oscar for Film Editing for “On the Waterfront” at the 27th Academy Awards at New York’s Century Theater on March 30, 1955. She was nominated for Best Actress that year for her role in “Carmen Jones”. 

Dear Mr. Harry Belafonte, Happy 87th Birthday! Thank you for more than 50 years of art and activism behind the scenes in Hollywood and on the frontlines of the civil rights movement. Thank you for speaking up early and often and creating Harbel Productions and producing projects like the film noir “Odds Against Tomorrow" in 1959 and the CBS television special written by Langston Hughes, “The Strollin’ 20’s”, a celebration of the Harlem Renaissance, in 1966. Thank you for still speaking up and enlightening us today. There was so much work to be done as you leaned against this Oscar statue at the Academy Awards on March 27, 1956, and you did it - and are still doing it! And for that sir, we thank you and wish you the happiest birthday and many more. Photo: Archive Photos/Getty Images.

Dear Mr. Harry Belafonte, Happy 87th Birthday! Thank you for more than 50 years of art and activism behind the scenes in Hollywood and on the frontlines of the civil rights movement. Thank you for speaking up early and often and creating Harbel Productions and producing projects like the film noir “Odds Against Tomorrow" in 1959 and the CBS television special written by Langston Hughes, “The Strollin’ 20’s”, a celebration of the Harlem Renaissance, in 1966. Thank you for still speaking up and enlightening us today. There was so much work to be done as you leaned against this Oscar statue at the Academy Awards on March 27, 1956, and you did it - and are still doing it! And for that sir, we thank you and wish you the happiest birthday and many more. Photo: Archive Photos/Getty Images.

Eartha Kitt stopping the trolley car in Istanbul with a pose (c.1949). This picture was shared via the Eartha Kitt fan page which is managed by Ms. Kitt’s daughter, Kitt Shapiro, owner of Simply Eartha If you would like to pre-order my book, go to this link - and thank you! http://vintageblackglamourbook.com/

Duke Ellington and President Harry Truman comparing musical notes at the White House on September 29, 1950. During another visit to Truman’s White House, the president, “wanting to converse as one piano player to another,” dismissed his guards and, as Mr. Ellington described it, he and the president acted like “a couple of cats in a billiard parlor.” Photo: Bettman/Corbis. PRE-ORDER for my new coffee table book Vintage Black Glamour is now available! http://vintageblackglamourbook.com/

Duke Ellington and President Harry Truman comparing musical notes at the White House on September 29, 1950. During another visit to Truman’s White House, the president, “wanting to converse as one piano player to another,” dismissed his guards and, as Mr. Ellington described it, he and the president acted like “a couple of cats in a billiard parlor.” Photo: Bettman/Corbis. PRE-ORDER for my new coffee table book Vintage Black Glamour is now available! http://vintageblackglamourbook.com/

Cecil Williams in the 1950s - and today. I am taking the liberty of posting Mr. Williams again so people can see him now. From my original post: I thought about this searing, beautiful picture today in light of recent events in the United States. I, like many others, shared it a few years ago on my blog, but it was only today that I finally found the name of the man in the photograph! His name is Cecil Williams and, he happens to be a photographer himself. The photo was probably taken by Mr. Williams mentor, John Goodwin, who joined him for a talk at Richland Library in Columbia, South Carolina in September 2013 about their experiences as black photographers in South Carolina during Jim Crow and the Civil Rights era. Mr. Williams, an Orangeburg, South Carolina native was a correspondent for Jet Magazine when he was only 15 and made national news after shooting some crucial pictures after the 1968 Orangeburg Massacre. This picture of Mr. Williams currently hangs over the water fountain on the Garden level of the Richland Library in Columbia, South Carolina.