Posts tagged "fashion"

Iman, photographed by Peter Marlow in London’s Hyde Park in 1979. Photo: Peter Marlow/Magnum Photos.

#NYFW: A pair of pioneers: Model and entrepreneur  Bethann Hardison and fashion designer Stephen Burrows at the opening party for “Tommy” in March 1975. Photo: Corbis

#NYFW: A pair of pioneers: Model and entrepreneur Bethann Hardison and fashion designer Stephen Burrows at the opening party for “Tommy” in March 1975. Photo: Corbis

Valeria Perojo Frias, born in Pinar del Rio, Cuba in 1926. Photo circa 1940s. This is one of the first pictures I shared on VBG, found via Scott Schuman’s fantastic blog, The Sartorialist. It was submitted by Ms. Frias’s daughter, Ena Frias, and she provided this description to The Sartorialist:

"This is my beautiful mother, Valeria Perojo Frias, born in Pinar del Rio, Cuba on March 23, 1926. This photograph was taken sometime in the mid to late 1940’s. I believe she was at a christening of a friend’s child in Havana. She was an amazing and inspirational woman - making her way to the US with my father by way of Miami in late 1959, and ending up in New York City two years later, where I was born and raised. She was always a fashionista and had that amazing aura that exuded beauty, charm and grace. And boy could she pose for a picture, eh? She always will be my very own personal style icon.”

I am happy to announce that Vintage Black Glamour - THE BOOK! -  is scheduled to be published in Spring 2014!  Starting today, you can register your interest in the book (registering is different from pre-ordering, which will be available starting early February) at vintageblackglamourbook.com. My publisher is Rocket 88 an imprint of London-based Essential Works, and after you register, you will be contacted by email in early 2014 with further details about the book and, if you wish, you may pre-order at that time. Once again, thank you so much! ~ Nichelle Gainer

Actress Esther Rolle (1920-1998) trying on a dress the Joseph Magnin store in Beverly Hills in 1974. Best known as Florida Evans on “Good Times,” Ms. Rolle was born to Bahamian immigrant parents in Pompano Beach, Florida, the 10th of 18 children. Inspired by two of her sisters who were also actresses (Rosanna Carter and Estelle Evans, who appeared in “To Kill a Mockingbird”) she moved to New York when she was 18 years old to begin a career in writing before she was talked into acting. She was also a dancer and performed with the Asadata Dafora troupe for twelve years before becoming a founding member of the Negro Ensemble Company. She also attended several colleges, most notably Spelman, and was a member of Zeta Phi Beta sorority. When asked about portraying a variety of maids throughout her career, Ms. Rolle told People magazine in 1990, “I’m glad to take on the role of a domestic because many of your black leaders, your educators, your professionals came from domestic parents who made sacrifices to see that their children didn’t go through what they did. But, I don’t play Hollywood maids, the hee-hee kind of people who are so in love with their madam’s children they have no time for their own.” Ms. Rolle was particularly concerned about black images and Hollywood and she was not shy about speaking up. She left her most famous role on “Good Times” in protest to what she thought was the increasing buffoonery of the J.J. character. She told People in that same 1990 interview, “I told the producers, ‘I did not agree to do a clown show for you to degrade young black men. I ruffle a lot of feathers. And I’m also selective—that makes you a troublemaker. But so be it. I laid a cornerstone for black actors, and that makes me happy.” Photo: Isaac Sutton from the Ted Williams and Ebony Collection at Art.com.

Actress Esther Rolle (1920-1998) trying on a dress the Joseph Magnin store in Beverly Hills in 1974. Best known as Florida Evans on “Good Times,” Ms. Rolle was born to Bahamian immigrant parents in Pompano Beach, Florida, the 10th of 18 children. Inspired by two of her sisters who were also actresses (Rosanna Carter and Estelle Evans, who appeared in “To Kill a Mockingbird”) she moved to New York when she was 18 years old to begin a career in writing before she was talked into acting. She was also a dancer and performed with the Asadata Dafora troupe for twelve years before becoming a founding member of the Negro Ensemble Company. She also attended several colleges, most notably Spelman, and was a member of Zeta Phi Beta sorority. When asked about portraying a variety of maids throughout her career, Ms. Rolle told People magazine in 1990, “I’m glad to take on the role of a domestic because many of your black leaders, your educators, your professionals came from domestic parents who made sacrifices to see that their children didn’t go through what they did. But, I don’t play Hollywood maids, the hee-hee kind of people who are so in love with their madam’s children they have no time for their own.” Ms. Rolle was particularly concerned about black images and Hollywood and she was not shy about speaking up. She left her most famous role on “Good Times” in protest to what she thought was the increasing buffoonery of the J.J. character. She told People in that same 1990 interview, “I told the producers, ‘I did not agree to do a clown show for you to degrade young black men. I ruffle a lot of feathers. And I’m also selective—that makes you a troublemaker. But so be it. I laid a cornerstone for black actors, and that makes me happy.” Photo: Isaac Sutton from the Ted Williams and Ebony Collection at Art.com.

I was very sad to learn of the passing of model Barbara Cheeseborough, best known as the model on the very first issue of Essence magazine in May 1970. Ms. Cheeseborough died of colon cancer on October 24 at the age of 67. A native of Philadelphia, she was signed to the Ford modeling agency and appeared in magazines including Vogue, Harper’s Bazaar and Cosmopolitan along with walking the runway for designers like Givenchy, Dior, Yves Saint Laurent and Calvin Klein. She was married for 47 years to William Edward Cheeseborough, a fashion photographer, and is survived by him and their daughter, Sia Suon Cheeseborough Bey, three brothers and two sisters. Photo: Essence.

I was very sad to learn of the passing of model Barbara Cheeseborough, best known as the model on the very first issue of Essence magazine in May 1970. Ms. Cheeseborough died of colon cancer on October 24 at the age of 67. A native of Philadelphia, she was signed to the Ford modeling agency and appeared in magazines including Vogue, Harper’s Bazaar and Cosmopolitan along with walking the runway for designers like Givenchy, Dior, Yves Saint Laurent and Calvin Klein. She was married for 47 years to William Edward Cheeseborough, a fashion photographer, and is survived by him and their daughter, Sia Suon Cheeseborough Bey, three brothers and two sisters. Photo: Essence.

Modeling legend Pat Cleveland as a 15-year-old Ebony Fashion Fair model in the 1960s. Ms. Cleveland posted this on her Instagram account.

Modeling legend Pat Cleveland as a 15-year-old Ebony Fashion Fair model in the 1960s. Ms. Cleveland posted this on her Instagram account.