Posts tagged "black women"

Today is the last day to pre-order in time to have your name listed inside of my Vintage Black Glamour book and have your name (or a loved one) listed in the Roll of Honour, a special set of pages to thank early supporters. You can still pre-order before the September release, but if you want to see your name in print, now is the time! You can pre-order by clicking HERE. Thank you!

*** UPDATE*** Many thanks to Shirley R. Gindler-Price and Jim Chew for pointing me in the right direction. This photo is one of thousands shot by  Philadelphia photographer John W. Mosley from the 1930s through the 1960s on Chicken Bone Beach in Atlantic City, NJ. Mr. Mosley’s archives are housed at Temple University in Philadelphia. Photo: John W. Mosley, Courtesy of the Charles L. Blockson Afro-American Collection, Temple University Libraries. This fabulous photo of beautiful friends (sisters? cousins?) has been making the rounds for eons online - via Pinterest, Tumblr, etc. However, no one has been able to identify any of these women or the photographer. I see the Shelburne (Hotel?) is in the background. Maybe they are in Atlantic City, NJ? If you have any information about the four women in this photo - or the photographer - please let me know in the comment section.

*** UPDATE*** Many thanks to Shirley R. Gindler-Price and Jim Chew for pointing me in the right direction. This photo is one of thousands shot by  Philadelphia photographer John W. Mosley from the 1930s through the 1960s on Chicken Bone Beach in Atlantic City, NJ. Mr. Mosley’s archives are housed at Temple University in Philadelphia. Photo: John W. Mosley, Courtesy of the Charles L. Blockson Afro-American Collection, Temple University Libraries. 
This fabulous photo of beautiful friends (sisters? cousins?) has been making the rounds for eons online - via Pinterest, Tumblr, etc. However, no one has been able to identify any of these women or the photographer. I see the Shelburne (Hotel?) is in the background. Maybe they are in Atlantic City, NJ? If you have any information about the four women in this photo - or the photographer - please let me know in the comment section.

"I believe that often young performers, lacking a continuity of experience, lacking a knowledge of the history of entertainment, of the tradition and great contributions that our people have made to theater, may tend to feel that a whole new world begins with each newcomer. Not so…. I maintain that we actresses must concern ourselves more with the fate of each other, and of the younger actresses coming along, by helping to find material and getting it produced and by promoting scholarships for intensive training.” ~ Ruby Dee, from an article she wrote for the April 1966 issue of Negro Digest entitled “Tattered Queens: Some Reflections on the Negro Actress.” In this photo, she is shown with baseball legend Jackie Robinson in a scene from the movie, “The Jackie Robinson Story,” where she played his wife, Rachel. Ms. Dee died at the age of 91 on Wednesday, June 11, 2014 at her home in New Rochelle, New York. Photo: Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, New York Public Library

Diana Sands on the 1972 poster for the film, “Georgia, Georgia”. The screenplay was written by none other than Dr. Maya Angelou, who also wrote the score for the film. I was lucky enough to find a full-size version of this poster a few years ago. Now to finally find a frame for it…

Diana Sands on the 1972 poster for the film, “Georgia, Georgia”. The screenplay was written by none other than Dr. Maya Angelou, who also wrote the score for the film. I was lucky enough to find a full-size version of this poster a few years ago. Now to finally find a frame for it…

Diahann Carroll poses with her Tony for “No Strings” (1962) with fellow winners, Robert Morse (“How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying”), Margaret Leighton (“Night of the Iguana”), and Paul Scofield (“A Man for All Seasons”) at the Waldorf-Astoria on April 29, 1962. Photo: Corbis.

Diahann Carroll poses with her Tony for “No Strings” (1962) with fellow winners, Robert Morse (“How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying”), Margaret Leighton (“Night of the Iguana”), and Paul Scofield (“A Man for All Seasons”) at the Waldorf-Astoria on April 29, 1962. Photo: Corbis.

Sara Lou Harris, one of the first Black models to appear in national advertisements, in the late 1940s. “We launched black girls into the modeling field and I was the first to become a national poster girl for cigarette advertising,” she told Ebony in 1974. The Bennett College graduate also toured Europe as a singer and had a brief career as a radio announcer and an actress. On February 14, 2011, she married Nathaniel Dixon in Silver Spring, Maryland. Photo: Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, New York Public Library

Sara Lou Harris, one of the first Black models to appear in national advertisements, in the late 1940s. “We launched black girls into the modeling field and I was the first to become a national poster girl for cigarette advertising,” she told Ebony in 1974. The Bennett College graduate also toured Europe as a singer and had a brief career as a radio announcer and an actress. On February 14, 2011, she married Nathaniel Dixon in Silver Spring, Maryland. Photo: Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, New York Public Library

A brief update on my Vintage Black Glamour book: If you pre-ordered the book, I trust that you received an email this morning from my publisher, Rocket 88 books. The good news is that the book looks great. I can’t tell you how excited to have so many never-before-seen images printed for the first time in my (first!) book. The not-so-good news is that the time my publishers and I spent securing many of these images from archives around the world has delayed the production to September 2014. The book is at the printer now in the beginning stages of the process that will bring it to your doorstep in the fall. 

I would like to thank everyone who has graciously pre-ordered the book and apologize for any inconvenience the delay presents to you. If you feel the wait will be too long, my publisher will happily send you a full refund. However, I hope you don’t mind sticking with me just a little bit longer because I really believe you will LOVE the result. Click here so you can get a sneak peek of some of the pages (updated from the previous “sneak peek”). Thank you again for all of your support, enthusiasm and interest - especially all of you “old-timers.” I am grateful for every bit of it.