Posts tagged "VBG men"

Happy Birthday Billy Dee Williams! 77 years of #smooth! He was born William December Williams in Harlem with his twin sister Loretta and graduated from Fiorello H. LaGuardia High School, the school that would later become known for the film and the television series, “Fame.” He was on scholarship at the National Academy of Fine Arts and Design when he returned to the acting he dabbled in as a child. He spent a few years doing small roles in theater before getting his first film role in the 1959 film, “The Last Angry Man.” Many of us swoon and think of Mr. Williams’s in “Lady Sings the Blues” and “Mahogany” with Diana Ross of course. However, the breakthrough role that opened the door for those parts was in the film “Brian’s Song,” as Chicago Bears football player, Gale Sayers. The film was based on Mr. Sayer’s friendship with his teammate, Brian Piccolo, who died of cancer at age 26 in 1970. Mr. Williams told Roger Ebert in 1975, “Right before “Brian’s Song” there was a period when I was very despondent, broke, depressed, my first marriage was on the rocks. The role of Gale Sayers had been cast with Lou Gossett, and then he hurt himself playing basketball. I was called in to read for the role. I was their last choice, and I knew it. I was very down, and I read the role that way, and the chemistry with Caan was good, so they hired me. That was the turning point. Sometimes I think there are spiritual forces that guide me and protect me, and know where to take me.” Photo: People magazine.

Marvin Gaye was born 75 years ago today in Washington, D.C. I can hardly believe that he was stolen from us 30 years ago. He is shown here, looking as smooth as ever in 1966. Photo: Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images.

Marvin Gaye was born 75 years ago today in Washington, D.C. I can hardly believe that he was stolen from us 30 years ago. He is shown here, looking as smooth as ever in 1966. Photo: Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images.

General Colin L. Powell proves the old adage “Nothing is new” is very true! He shared this 60 year old photo of himself on his official Facebook page with this caption: “Throwback Thursday - I was doing selfies 60 years before you Facebook folks. Eat your heart out Ellen! The Ellen DeGeneres Show

I’ve always thought this photo of Smokey Robinson, lookin’ all smooth in a satin shirt and medallion in L.A. in the 1960s, was very cool. I’ve got my eye on it for the men’s edition of Vintage Black Glamour but in the meantime, the ladies are just about ready for you (June 2014!) You can pre-order right here! http://www.vintageblackglamourbook.com Photo: Michael Ochs Archives/Getty.

I’ve always thought this photo of Smokey Robinson, lookin’ all smooth in a satin shirt and medallion in L.A. in the 1960s, was very cool. I’ve got my eye on it for the men’s edition of Vintage Black Glamour but in the meantime, the ladies are just about ready for you (June 2014!) You can pre-order right here! http://www.vintageblackglamourbook.com Photo: Michael Ochs Archives/Getty.

Billy Dee Williams arrives at the Academy Awards on March 28, 1973. Mr. Williams, a presenter that night, appeared as Louis McKay in “Lady Sings the Blues” which was nominated for five Oscars. Photo: Corbis.

Billy Dee Williams arrives at the Academy Awards on March 28, 1973. Mr. Williams, a presenter that night, appeared as Louis McKay in “Lady Sings the Blues” which was nominated for five Oscars. Photo: Corbis.

Dear Mr. Harry Belafonte, Happy 87th Birthday! Thank you for more than 50 years of art and activism behind the scenes in Hollywood and on the frontlines of the civil rights movement. Thank you for speaking up early and often and creating Harbel Productions and producing projects like the film noir “Odds Against Tomorrow" in 1959 and the CBS television special written by Langston Hughes, “The Strollin’ 20’s”, a celebration of the Harlem Renaissance, in 1966. Thank you for still speaking up and enlightening us today. There was so much work to be done as you leaned against this Oscar statue at the Academy Awards on March 27, 1956, and you did it - and are still doing it! And for that sir, we thank you and wish you the happiest birthday and many more. Photo: Archive Photos/Getty Images.

Dear Mr. Harry Belafonte, Happy 87th Birthday! Thank you for more than 50 years of art and activism behind the scenes in Hollywood and on the frontlines of the civil rights movement. Thank you for speaking up early and often and creating Harbel Productions and producing projects like the film noir “Odds Against Tomorrow" in 1959 and the CBS television special written by Langston Hughes, “The Strollin’ 20’s”, a celebration of the Harlem Renaissance, in 1966. Thank you for still speaking up and enlightening us today. There was so much work to be done as you leaned against this Oscar statue at the Academy Awards on March 27, 1956, and you did it - and are still doing it! And for that sir, we thank you and wish you the happiest birthday and many more. Photo: Archive Photos/Getty Images.

Roland Hayes, the brilliant tenor (listen to his voice HERE!) who became the first African-American man to earn international fame as a concert vocalist, photographed by Addison Scurlock in 1940. Born to former slaves in Curryville, Georgia in 1887, he attended Fisk University and briefly toured with the Fisk Jubilee Singers. Early in his career, he was turned down by talent managers because he was Black so, he invested in himself: He raised money and arranged and financed his own concert performances,which included Negro spirituals, lieder and arias by Schubert, Tchaikovsky, and Mozart. In 1942, Mr. Hayes’s wife, Helen and daughter, Afrika, sat in a whites-only area of a shoe store and were thrown out of the store. When Mr. Hayes defended his family, he was beaten and he and his wife were arrested - and the governor of Georgia was absolutely fine with it. The incident inspired Langston Hughes to compose the poem, Roland Hayes Beaten. Mr. Hayes would later teach at Boston University and would go on to celebrate more than 50 years on the concert stage before his death in 1977.
PRE-ORDER FOR VINTAGE BLACK GLAMOUR (THE BOOK!) IS AVAILABLE NOW!http://vintageblackglamourbook.com/

Roland Hayes, the brilliant tenor (listen to his voice HERE!) who became the first African-American man to earn international fame as a concert vocalist, photographed by Addison Scurlock in 1940. Born to former slaves in Curryville, Georgia in 1887, he attended Fisk University and briefly toured with the Fisk Jubilee Singers. Early in his career, he was turned down by talent managers because he was Black so, he invested in himself: He raised money and arranged and financed his own concert performances,which included Negro spirituals, lieder and arias by Schubert, Tchaikovsky, and Mozart. In 1942, Mr. Hayes’s wife, Helen and daughter, Afrika, sat in a whites-only area of a shoe store and were thrown out of the store. When Mr. Hayes defended his family, he was beaten and he and his wife were arrested - and the governor of Georgia was absolutely fine with it. The incident inspired Langston Hughes to compose the poem, Roland Hayes Beaten. Mr. Hayes would later teach at Boston University and would go on to celebrate more than 50 years on the concert stage before his death in 1977.

PRE-ORDER FOR VINTAGE BLACK GLAMOUR (THE BOOK!) IS AVAILABLE NOW!http://vintageblackglamourbook.com/