Posts tagged "VBG"
Today is the 2nd anniversary of Vintage Black Glamour! I had the original idea in 2005, but the Tumblr blog, Twitter account @VintageBlkGlam and this Facebook page were born on January 17, 2011. I love VBG’s profile picture of Carmen de Lavallade on the cover of Hue in 1954, but I hope to have the cover of my Vintage Black Glamour book as the profile picture by the next anniversary. Keep your fingers crossed for me, won’t you? ;)

Today is the 2nd anniversary of Vintage Black Glamour! I had the original idea in 2005, but the Tumblr blog, Twitter account @VintageBlkGlam and this Facebook page were born on January 17, 2011. I love VBG’s profile picture of Carmen de Lavallade on the cover of Hue in 1954, but I hope to have the cover of my Vintage Black Glamour book as the profile picture by the next anniversary. Keep your fingers crossed for me, won’t you? ;)

As of today, 25,000 @Tumblr followers for @VintageBlkGlam - Thank you! In the photo, Sammy Davis Jr. is celebrating his new album on Frank Sinatra’s record label, Reprise, in London on September 5, 1961. Photo via Hulton-Deutsch/Corbis

As of today, 25,000 @Tumblr followers for @VintageBlkGlam - Thank you! In the photo, Sammy Davis Jr. is celebrating his new album on Frank Sinatra’s record label, Reprise, in London on September 5, 1961. Photo via Hulton-Deutsch/Corbis

Rosalind Cash. She was so determined to avoid stereotypical roles, she took jobs as a waitress, a salesgirl and even a nightclub singer in the early days of her career.  Later generations would recognize her from “A Different World,” and “General Hospital,” but she was also a stellar theater actress and an original member of the Negro Ensemble Company. Her films included “Klute,” “The Omega Man,”  ”Cornbread, Earl and Me,” “Uptown Saturday Night,” and many others. On television, she appeared in an adapation of James Baldwin’s “Go Tell It On The Mountain,” Melvin Van Peebles’ “Sophisticated Gents,” and Maya Angelou’s, “Sister, Sister” with Diahann Carroll and Irene Cara. 

Donald Bogle said it best: 
Seldom in Hollywood’s history was a black woman so repeatedly wasted, so thoroughly trashed by the industry.  And the roles this gifted woman found herself playing often revealed Hollywood’s basic contempt for the talented, not-easily-typed black actress.  In a way, though, the roles, coupled with Cash’s high-strung artistry, created a persona for her.  As with Gloria Foster, perceptive audiences sat watching Rosalind Cash, using her as a symbol of their own broken promises and unfulfilled dreams.

Born in Atlantic City, NJ, Ms. Cash died of cancer at age 56 in 1995.

Rosalind Cash. She was so determined to avoid stereotypical roles, she took jobs as a waitress, a salesgirl and even a nightclub singer in the early days of her career.  Later generations would recognize her from “A Different World,” and “General Hospital,” but she was also a stellar theater actress and an original member of the Negro Ensemble Company. Her films included “Klute,” “The Omega Man,”  ”Cornbread, Earl and Me,” “Uptown Saturday Night,” and many others. On television, she appeared in an adapation of James Baldwin’s “Go Tell It On The Mountain,” Melvin Van Peebles’ “Sophisticated Gents,” and Maya Angelou’s, “Sister, Sister” with Diahann Carroll and Irene Cara

Donald Bogle said it best: 

Seldom in Hollywood’s history was a black woman so repeatedly wasted, so thoroughly trashed by the industry.  And the roles this gifted woman found herself playing often revealed Hollywood’s basic contempt for the talented, not-easily-typed black actress.  In a way, though, the roles, coupled with Cash’s high-strung artistry, created a persona for her.  As with Gloria Foster, perceptive audiences sat watching Rosalind Cash, using her as a symbol of their own broken promises and unfulfilled dreams.

Born in Atlantic City, NJ, Ms. Cash died of cancer at age 56 in 1995.

Have you ever seen Sammy dance with Eartha Kitt? Like to see it? Here it go! #AnnaLucasta 

Eartha Kitt and Sammy Davis, Jr. dancing in the infamous mambo sequence from their controversial film, Anna Lucasta

Kitt and Davis not only starred in the film, they had financial participation. Before Anna Lucasta’s world premiere in 1958, the MPAA Advertising Code Administration refused to approve several ads for the film claiming, according to The Hollywood Reporter, “that the ads blatantly portray the femme lead as a prostitute” and that the ‘art emphasizes her posterior.”  Kitt and Davis also sent letters to hundreds of exhibitors in the south because many Southern theaters did not book the film on “racial grounds.” 

http://55secretstreet.typepad.com/anovelista/2009/02/eartha-kitt-the-oscar-montage-omission-and-why-it-matters.html