Posts tagged "Scurlock Studio"

Happy Founders Day to the wonderful women of Alpha Kappa Alpha! The first sorority for African-American women was founded 105 years ago today at Howard Univerity, where this photo was taken in 1945 by the legendary photographer, Addison N. Scurlock (1883-1964). Photo: Scurlock Studio Records, ca. 1905-1994, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.

Effie Moore with a group of vaudeville dancers, circa 1930s. Photo: Addison Scurlock via Studio Records, ca. 1905-1994, Archives Center, National Museum of American History/Smithsonian

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Argentine Dancers at Howard University, 1963

  • by Scurlock Studio

An Argentine dancer instructing a group of women at Howard University in February 1963. Another gem from the Scurlock Studio. 

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  • by Scurlock Studio

A woman playing the violin at Howard University School of Music, circa 1940s. Photo: Scurlock Studio.

Roland Hayes, the brilliant tenor who became the first African-American man to earn international fame as a concert vocalist, photographed by Addison Scurlock in 1940. Born to former slaves in Curryville, Georgia in 1887, he attended Fisk University and briefly toured with the Fisk Jubilee Singers. Early in his career, he was turned down by talent managers because he was Black so, he invested in himself: He raised money and arranged and financed his own concert performances,which included Negro spirituals, lieder and arias by Schubert, Tchaikovsky, and Mozart. In 1942, Mr. Hayes’s wife, Helen and daughter, Afrika, sat in a whites-only area of a shoe store and were thrown out of the store. When Mr. Hayes defended his family, he was beaten and he and his wife were arrested - and the governor of Georgia was absolutely fine with it. The incident inspired Langston Hughes to compose the poem, Roland Hayes Beaten. Mr. Hayes would later teach at Boston University and would go on to celebrate more than 50 years on the concert stage before his death in 1977.

Actress Fredi Washington holding a cigarette, photographed by Robert Scurlock of the venerable  Scurlock Studio of Washington, DC, circa 1940s. Photo via The Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of American History.