Posts tagged "Margot Webb"

I really believe you are going to faint when you see the gorgeous photos I have of Margot Webb and her dance partner, Harold Norton, in Vintage Black Glamour. Their photos only tell part of their story. Their undeniable elegance turned out to be a blessing – and a curse for their career. You’ll read more about it in the book, but Ms. Webb herself told the dance scholar Brenda Dixon-Gottschild that dwindling opportunities solidified her decision to return to school. After her dance days were long gone, she earned a bachelor’s degree at Hunter College in 1940 and a master’s degree in education from Columbia University Teachers College in 1948.

lascasartoris:

Dancer, Margot Webb c1934

“Margot Webb was a headline dancer in the Cotton Club 1933-1939. She danced Waltz, Tango, Bolero with her partner Norton in the dance team of “Norton & Margot”. They performed in London, Paris and Germany before WW II.”

Another great photograph of Margot with her dancing partner at VIntage Black Glamour

Another fantastic shot of dancer Margot Webb. Born Marjorie Smith in Harlem in 1910, she dropped out of Hunter College and began her career as a dancer. Later in life, she became a physical education teacher and she may very well still be alive. Brenda Dixon Gottschild found her living in Miami as recently as 2000

lascasartoris:

African-American dancer Margot Webb, c1934

Margot Webb, a Cotton Club dancer (circa 1934) who gained even more notoriety as a ballroom dancer with her partner Harold Norton. They performed as “Norton and Margot” in the 1930s and 1940s. Brenda Dixon Gottschild (Amel Larrieux’s mother) has a wonderful book, Waltzing in the Dark: African American Vaudeville and Race Politics in the Swing Era, with a wealth of information on their career. Photo: Harry Possner via AmericanMemorabilia.com

tayarijones:

The couple that grooms together, stays together: these lovers have a serious eyebrow connection.

blackloveisabeautifulthing:

Norton and Margot

Ballroom dancers Margot Webb and Harold Norton. They performed as “Norton and Margot” in the 1930s and 1940s. Brenda Dixon Gottschild (Amel Larrieux’s mother) has a wonderful book, Waltzing in the Dark: African American Vaudeville and Race Politics in the Swing Era, with a wealth of information on their career.