Posts tagged "London"
A member of the African Choir, London Stereoscopic Company, 1891. From The Guardian:
The African Choir were a group of young South African singers that toured Britain between 1891 and 1893. They were formed to raise funds for a Christian school in their home country and performed for Queen Victoria at Osborne House, a royal residence on the Isle of Wight. At some point during their stay, they visited the studio of the London Stereoscopic Company to have group and individual portraits made on plate-glass negatives. That long-lost series of photographs, unseen for 120 years, is the dramatic centrepiece of an illuminating new exhibition called Black Chronicles II.
Photo: Hulton Archive/Getty Images

A member of the African Choir, London Stereoscopic Company, 1891. From The Guardian:

The African Choir were a group of young South African singers that toured Britain between 1891 and 1893. They were formed to raise funds for a Christian school in their home country and performed for Queen Victoria at Osborne House, a royal residence on the Isle of Wight. At some point during their stay, they visited the studio of the London Stereoscopic Company to have group and individual portraits made on plate-glass negatives. That long-lost series of photographs, unseen for 120 years, is the dramatic centrepiece of an illuminating new exhibition called Black Chronicles II.

Photo: Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Iman, photographed by Peter Marlow in London’s Hyde Park in 1979. Photo: Peter Marlow/Magnum Photos.

The Divine One herself, Sarah Vaughan was born 90 years ago today in Newark, New Jersey. In this 1960 photo (Getty) she is on tour in London.

The Divine One herself, Sarah Vaughan was born 90 years ago today in Newark, New Jersey. In this 1960 photo (Getty) she is on tour in London.

Marvin Gaye strolling ahead of his Rolls Royce in Notting Hill, London, in 1976. Photo: John Minihan/Getty. 

(via tballardbrown)

The Supremes (Florence Ballard, Mary Wilson and Diana Ross) and Martha Reeves and The Vandellas (Martha Reeves (far right), Rosalyn Ashford, and Betty Kelly) in London, March 1965. Photo by Keystone-France/Gamma-Keystone via Getty Images.

The Supremes (Florence Ballard, Mary Wilson and Diana Ross) and Martha Reeves and The Vandellas (Martha Reeves (far right), Rosalyn Ashford, and Betty Kelly) in London, March 1965. Photo by Keystone-France/Gamma-Keystone via Getty Images.

One of the earliest Black superstars, singer Florence Mills (1896-1927) on August 1, 1923 in ‘Dover Street to Dixie’ at the London Pavilion. Best known as the lead in the first all-black Broadway musical, “Shuffle Along” in 1921, Ms. Mills sudden death in 1927 at the height of her popularity devastated her friends and fans in the United States and Europe. An estimated 150,000 people lined the streets of Harlem to mourn her passing. Photo: Bassano/National Portrait Gallery, London.

Elisabeth Welch, the American singer who introduced the “Charleston” on Broadway before becoming a superstar in England, in 1935. Born in Manhattan in 1904 to a Scottish-Irish mother and African American father, Ms. Welch was a favorite of iconic composers Noël Coward and Cole Porter. She was the first singer to popularize the classic Porter tune, “Love for Sale” and it would become a signature song in her career. She also introduced “Stormy Weather” to British audiences and would be so beloved there, she remained for the rest of her life. Ms. Welch, among other career highlights in her 70-year career, was nominated for a Tony award for Best Featured Actress in a Musical in 1986 at age 82, for her role in “Jerome Kern Goes to Hollywood.” Ms. Welch also starred in two films with Paul Robeson, “Song of Freedom” in 1936 and “Big Fella” in 1937. In the comment section, I am linking a fantastic short video (1:56) of Ms. Welch singing “Harlem in my Heart” from “Big Fella” and Mr. Robeson can be seen in the clip. Photo: National Portrait Gallery, London.