Posts tagged "Eartha Kitt"
The unforgettable Eartha Kitt selling the new Carver-Washington half-dollars - for $2 each - at Macy’s in New York City in August 1952. The promotion was a special program to aid the Booker T. Washington Birthplace Memorial. The coins were embossed with the slogan, “Freedom and Opportunity For All - Americanism.” Photo: Bettman/Corbis.

The unforgettable Eartha Kitt selling the new Carver-Washington half-dollars - for $2 each - at Macy’s in New York City in August 1952. The promotion was a special program to aid the Booker T. Washington Birthplace Memorial. The coins were embossed with the slogan, “Freedom and Opportunity For All - Americanism.” Photo: Bettman/Corbis.

Vintage Black Glamour is a bit like a high-minded celebrity Instagram feed that challenges and adds to American pop culture iconography… Gainer’s collection of images isn’t your grade-school Black History Month bulletin board. “Vintage Black Glamour” reminds you that these people had friends and confidants and lovers and charming idiosyncrasies, and that’s what Gainer wants you to see: humanity. “Every month is Black History Month on ‘Vintage Black Glamour,’” she said.” Many thanks to Soraya Nadia McDonald for this fantastic article on VBG in today’s Washington Post! I think she did a good job of explaining what I am doing with Vintage Black Glamour.

Eartha Kitt stopping the trolley car in Istanbul with a pose (c.1949). This picture was shared via the Eartha Kitt fan page which is managed by Ms. Kitt’s daughter, Kitt Shapiro, owner of Simply Eartha If you would like to pre-order my book, go to this link - and thank you! http://vintageblackglamourbook.com/

Eartha Kitt in 1948 as a Katherine Dunham dancer performing in Street scene, part of Motivos, choreographed by Ms. Dunham. Ms. Kitt began her illustrious career as a dancer with Ms. Dunham’s company after a serendipitous encounter outside of a theater. A pretty young woman walked up to her and asked her directions to Max Factor’s makeup shop. Ms. Kitt said, “But you are so pretty. Why would you want to wear makeup?” When the woman replied that she was sent to buy the makeup for Katherine Dunham, Ms. Kitt made a deal with her: “Tell me how to meet Katherine Dunham and I’ll give you directions to the makeup shop!” And the rest, of course, is history. Photo: Roger Wood, New York Public Library for the Performing Arts.

Eartha Kitt photographed by the legendary Charles “Teenie” Harris in May 1966, leaping though a poster to launch a Citizens Committee on Hill District Renewal program on Vine and Colwell Streets in Pittsburgh, PA. Mr. Harris (1908-1998) was a photographer who captured the full-spectrum of African American life for over forty years, primarily as one of the principal photographers for the Pittsburgh Courier newspaper. Few photographers anywhere captured us so well: from family life to beauty contests to sporting events, social life, civil rights demonstrations and visiting celebrities, Mr. Harris was there with the Speed Graphic camera that he would use well into the 1970s. Photo: Carnegie Museum of Art

Eartha Kitt photographed by the legendary Charles “Teenie” Harris in May 1966, leaping though a poster to launch a Citizens Committee on Hill District Renewal program on Vine and Colwell Streets in Pittsburgh, PA. Mr. Harris (1908-1998) was a photographer who captured the full-spectrum of African American life for over forty years, primarily as one of the principal photographers for the Pittsburgh Courier newspaper. Few photographers anywhere captured us so well: from family life to beauty contests to sporting events, social life, civil rights demonstrations and visiting celebrities, Mr. Harris was there with the Speed Graphic camera that he would use well into the 1970s. Photo: Carnegie Museum of Art

Eartha Kitt photographed by Gordon Parks as she was being fitted for a dress by a woman who I am 99.9% sure is none other than the pioneering fashion designer Zelda Wynn Valdes in 1952.

Eartha Kitt photographed by Gordon Parks as she was being fitted for a dress by a woman who I am 99.9% sure is none other than the pioneering fashion designer Zelda Wynn Valdes in 1952.

Cary Grant visits Eartha Kitt and Cab Calloway on the set of their film, “Anna Lucasta” in 1959.