Posts tagged "Broadway"
The great Geoffrey Holder won two Tony Awards in 1978 for costume design and directing “The Wiz.” He is shown here in all of his 6’6” splendor in the October 1975 issue of Ebony.

The great Geoffrey Holder won two Tony Awards in 1978 for costume design and directing “The Wiz.” He is shown here in all of his 6’6” splendor in the October 1975 issue of Ebony.

Diahann Carroll poses with her Tony for “No Strings” (1962) with fellow winners, Robert Morse (“How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying”), Margaret Leighton (“Night of the Iguana”), and Paul Scofield (“A Man for All Seasons”) at the Waldorf-Astoria on April 29, 1962. Photo: Corbis.

Diahann Carroll poses with her Tony for “No Strings” (1962) with fellow winners, Robert Morse (“How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying”), Margaret Leighton (“Night of the Iguana”), and Paul Scofield (“A Man for All Seasons”) at the Waldorf-Astoria on April 29, 1962. Photo: Corbis.

Lena Horne and Josephine Premice in a scene from the 1958 Broadway musical Jamaica. Ms. Premice (1926-2001), a phenomenal Haitian-American singer, dancer and actress, was nominated for a Tony Award for her role in the show. She was also the mother of writer/producer Susan Fales-Hill. Photo: Bettman/Corbis.

Lena Horne and Josephine Premice in a scene from the 1958 Broadway musical Jamaica. Ms. Premice (1926-2001), a phenomenal Haitian-American singer, dancer and actress, was nominated for a Tony Award for her role in the show. She was also the mother of writer/producer Susan Fales-Hill. Photo: Bettman/Corbis.

Harry Belafonte, Martin Luther King Jr., theater and film producer Hillard Elkins and Sammy Davis Jr. in April 1965 at “Broadway Answers Selma,” a show Mr. Hillard produced to raise money for Dr. King. Mr. Hillard managed Mr. Davis and other legends like Steve McQueen, and he was one of the subjects in the book, “The Producers: Profiles in Frustration,” and he mentions this photograph to the author: “Hilly points to a photo on the wall of four men. “I think you will recognize the players. It’s Harry Belafonte, Sammy Davis Jr., Martin Luther King and me.” Above the photo is a framed letter from Dr. Martin Luther King to Hillard Elkins, thanking him for “Golden Boy” and for coming to Selma, Alabama to march. “I closed the show and we all went to Selma, Alabama and marched. When we came back, I wanted to do something for Dr. King. I put on a show, “Broadway Answers Selma,” raising money for Dr. King.” Many thanks to Kanisha Johnson, the patron saint of Dorothy Dandridge online (see DorothyDandridgeForever.com) for bringing this picture to my attention. Photo: Bandphoto Agency. 

The brilliant, peerless, hilarious Richard Pryor (1940-2005) was born 73 years ago today in Peoria, IL. In this photo, he and Phylicia Rashad are paying a visit to Ms. Rashad’s sister Debbie Allen in her dressing room on April 27, 1986. Ms. Allen had just opened in the return of Sweet Charity on Broadway. Photo by Ezio.Vintage Black Glamour (The Coffee Table Book!) is coming in 2014! Register your interest here http://bit.ly/VBGbook And thank you!

The brilliant, peerless, hilarious Richard Pryor (1940-2005) was born 73 years ago today in Peoria, IL. In this photo, he and Phylicia Rashad are paying a visit to Ms. Rashad’s sister Debbie Allen in her dressing room on April 27, 1986. Ms. Allen had just opened in the return of Sweet Charity on Broadway. Photo by Ezio.

Vintage Black Glamour (The Coffee Table Book!) is coming in 2014! Register your interest here http://bit.ly/VBGbook And thank you!

Singer and actress Ruby Hill in character as “Della Green” from the 1946 Broadway production of “St. Louis Woman.” The Virginia-born Ms. Hill would go on to tell JET magazine in a cover story for their July 30, 1953 issue, that she believed her career suffered from the “Lena Horne jinx” because she resembled (and was modeled after) Ms. Horne too closely. “St. Louis Woman” was based on Arna Bontemps’ novel “God Sends Sunday” and written by Mr. Bontemps and Countee Cullen, with music by Harold Arlen and lyrics by Johnny Mercer. This photo was taken on July 2, 1946 by Carl Van Vechten. Photo: Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library
Percy Verwayne (1895-1968) was the original Sportin’ Life in the 1927 Broadway DuBose and Dorothy Heyward play, “Porgy,” the precursor to the iconic 1935 George Gershwin opera “Porgy and Bess.” Mr. Verwayne was born in British Guiana (now Guyana) and appeared on Broadway, on radio and in several films for at least thirty years, but he was best known in his day for originating the role of Sportin’ Life. He was also a former athlete and that came in handy in 1941 when he was robbed of 75 cents by a very unwise 18-year-old within two blocks of his Harlem home at 400 West 128th street. The incident was gleefully reported in the New York Amsterdam News on August 9, 1941 under the headline, “Mugger Gets Wrong Victim.” According to the paper, when the mugger tried to run away, “Verwayne chased him for a block, grabbed him by the seat of his trousers and socked him into submission. When the cops arrived, Verwayne was in complete control of the situation.” I’ll bet he was… haha! Photo: New York Public Library, Billy Rose Theater Collection.

Percy Verwayne (1895-1968) was the original Sportin’ Life in the 1927 Broadway DuBose and Dorothy Heyward play, “Porgy,” the precursor to the iconic 1935 George Gershwin opera “Porgy and Bess.” Mr. Verwayne was born in British Guiana (now Guyana) and appeared on Broadway, on radio and in several films for at least thirty years, but he was best known in his day for originating the role of Sportin’ Life. He was also a former athlete and that came in handy in 1941 when he was robbed of 75 cents by a very unwise 18-year-old within two blocks of his Harlem home at 400 West 128th street. The incident was gleefully reported in the New York Amsterdam News on August 9, 1941 under the headline, “Mugger Gets Wrong Victim.” According to the paper, when the mugger tried to run away, “Verwayne chased him for a block, grabbed him by the seat of his trousers and socked him into submission. When the cops arrived, Verwayne was in complete control of the situation.” I’ll bet he was… haha! Photo: New York Public Library, Billy Rose Theater Collection.