Posts tagged "1950s"

My father, Erskine Butterfield, was a musician in Newark, NJ during the 1930s-1950s. He is credited with helping to create what is known as “Cocktail Music.” He had his own weekly radio program atop Bamberger’s Department Store in downtown Newark at WOR radio. One of his guests was a then unknown singer, Miss Lena Horne. He also recorded for the Decca and New Brunswick labels, and was a protege of Willie “The Lion Smith”, because he had a strong left hand; he played and composed Boogie Woogie music.”

I am so pleased and impressed with the submissions to #myVBG! We have beautiful mothers, grandmothers, aunts, family friends and fathers like Jacqueline Butterfield’s father, Erskine Butterfield. Jacqueline’s note and photo of her dad on #myVBG made my “Nichelle’s Picks” page.

I would love to see your family and friends on on #myVBG. Upload your photos at http://myvbg.com/ with her name, city, date/location of photo, a fun VBG-ish fact about her with #myVBG and #vbgbook. I am selecting a few pictures on the “Nichelle’s Picks” page but really, every submission is my “favorite.” Thank you!

I am excited to announce Vintage Black Glamour’s fan site #myVBG! It was created so we can see and properly admire the VBG icons in YOUR life! I want to see women in your family like your grandmother who may remind you of Lena Horne or Diahann Carroll; a favorite diva aunt with the zest of a Josephine Baker or Gladys Bentley; a mother who brings to mind the heady brilliance of a Dr. Maya Angelou or Ruby Dee. The first three pictures are already up, my mother, grandmother and the beautiful lady picture here, my late great-grandmother Nellie Parson Swilley, my beloved “Mama Nell” in the 1940s. She was so lovely and sharp that a lady tried to buy the hat off of her head after church one day. This is not some family legend - I was actually standing there and watching in amazement at Sandy Mount Baptist Church in Smithfield,Virginia as this lady tried to buy her hat!) Mama Nell also taught me how to cook – and called me Sugarlump.I would be honored to have you share the divas in your family here for the world to see. 
Upload your photos at http://myvbg.com/ and tell us a brief story about her name, city, date and location of photo, a fun VBG-ish fact about her and tag me on Twitter (@VintageBlkGlam) or here on Tumblr with the hashtag #myVBG and#vbgbook. Thank you – I can’t wait to see your #myVBG!

I am excited to announce Vintage Black Glamour’s fan site #myVBG! It was created so we can see and properly admire the VBG icons in YOUR life! I want to see women in your family like your grandmother who may remind you of Lena Horne or Diahann Carroll; a favorite diva aunt with the zest of a Josephine Baker or Gladys Bentley; a mother who brings to mind the heady brilliance of a Dr. Maya Angelou or Ruby Dee. The first three pictures are already up, my mother, grandmother and the beautiful lady picture here, my late great-grandmother Nellie Parson Swilley, my beloved “Mama Nell” in the 1940s. She was so lovely and sharp that a lady tried to buy the hat off of her head after church one day. This is not some family legend - I was actually standing there and watching in amazement at Sandy Mount Baptist Church in Smithfield,Virginia as this lady tried to buy her hat!) Mama Nell also taught me how to cook – and called me Sugarlump.

I would be honored to have you share the divas in your family here for the world to see.

Upload your photos at http://myvbg.com/ and tell us a brief story about her name, city, date and location of photo, a fun VBG-ish fact about her and tag me on Twitter (@VintageBlkGlam) or here on Tumblr with the hashtag #myVBG and#vbgbook. Thank you – I can’t wait to see your #myVBG!

I’ve always loved this photo of Dorothy Dandridge relaxing with extras on the set of “Carmen Jones”. What do you think they were talking about? Photo: Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, New York Public Library

Josephine Premice (1926-2001), the splendid Tony-nominated actress, singer and dancer was born 88 years ago today in Brooklyn, New York. Diahann Carroll, her best friend for more than four decades, called the Haitian-American aesthete “a naturally elegant woman who had exquisite taste in everything in life” and credited her with her fashion advice that she still uses. Ms. Premice was also the mother of novelist and television producer (“A Different World”) Susan Fales-Hill who wrote a fantastic memoir about her mother called “Always Wear Joy.” In this photo, Ms. Premice is seen tying the ribbon on her high-heeled shoes just before a performance in May 1951. Photo: Kurt Hutton/Stringer/Getty Images.

Billy Eckstine, one of the smoothest balladeers and bandleaders ever (and the man responsible for giving Sarah Vaughan one of her first big breaks) was born 100 years ago today in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. One of my favorite fun facts about Mr. Eckstine: he won a singing competition imitating Cab Calloway when he was a student at Howard University in the 1930s. In this photo, he is adjusting his tie while his first wife, June, applies her lipstick in their Manhattan apartment on April 11, 1950. Photo: Martha Holmes, one of the first female staff photographers at LIFE magazine.

Billy Eckstine, one of the smoothest balladeers and bandleaders ever (and the man responsible for giving Sarah Vaughan one of her first big breaks) was born 100 years ago today in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. One of my favorite fun facts about Mr. Eckstine: he won a singing competition imitating Cab Calloway when he was a student at Howard University in the 1930s. In this photo, he is adjusting his tie while his first wife, June, applies her lipstick in their Manhattan apartment on April 11, 1950. Photo: Martha Holmes, one of the first female staff photographers at LIFE magazine.

The unforgettable Eartha Kitt selling the new Carver-Washington half-dollars - for $2 each - at Macy’s in New York City in August 1952. The promotion was a special program to aid the Booker T. Washington Birthplace Memorial. The coins were embossed with the slogan, “Freedom and Opportunity For All - Americanism.” Photo: Bettman/Corbis.

The unforgettable Eartha Kitt selling the new Carver-Washington half-dollars - for $2 each - at Macy’s in New York City in August 1952. The promotion was a special program to aid the Booker T. Washington Birthplace Memorial. The coins were embossed with the slogan, “Freedom and Opportunity For All - Americanism.” Photo: Bettman/Corbis.

Tennis legend Althea Gibson (1927-2003), the first Black winner of the French Open (1956), the US Open and Wimbledon (both in 1957), photographed by Carl Van Vechten on November 20, 1958. Photo: Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library