Posts tagged "1950s"
I’ve always really loved this picture of Josephine Baker and Joe Louis in Paris in the 1950s. The photo caption from Bettman/Corbis read that Ms. Baker was encouraging Mr. Louis to sing with her during her opening performance at the Club Des Champs Elysees, but I’ve always wondered about the whole night: What did they talk about? Who were they with that evening? There are other photos of them together in this time frame and it’s clear that they were friends (not romantic) and probably had very interesting conversations. Photo by Rene Henry, Bettman/Corbis.

I’ve always really loved this picture of Josephine Baker and Joe Louis in Paris in the 1950s. The photo caption from Bettman/Corbis read that Ms. Baker was encouraging Mr. Louis to sing with her during her opening performance at the Club Des Champs Elysees, but I’ve always wondered about the whole night: What did they talk about? Who were they with that evening? There are other photos of them together in this time frame and it’s clear that they were friends (not romantic) and probably had very interesting conversations. Photo by Rene Henry, Bettman/Corbis.

Happy 86th Birthday to Dr. Maya Angelou! Dr. Angelou avoided celebrating her birthday for years after her friend, Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., was assassinated on her 40th birthday in 1968. Instead, she and her friend Coretta Scott King would “meet or talk or send each other flowers.” She is shown here doing a little reading in her room before performing at New York’s Village Vanguard in the late 1950s. Photo: G. Marshall Wilson, Art.com.

Happy 86th Birthday to Dr. Maya Angelou! Dr. Angelou avoided celebrating her birthday for years after her friend, Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., was assassinated on her 40th birthday in 1968. Instead, she and her friend Coretta Scott King would “meet or talk or send each other flowers.” She is shown here doing a little reading in her room before performing at New York’s Village Vanguard in the late 1950s. Photo: G. Marshall Wilson, Art.com.

General Colin L. Powell proves the old adage “Nothing is new” is very true! He shared this 60 year old photo of himself on his official Facebook page with this caption: “Throwback Thursday - I was doing selfies 60 years before you Facebook folks. Eat your heart out Ellen! The Ellen DeGeneres Show

Lena Horne and Josephine Premice in a scene from the 1958 Broadway musical Jamaica. Ms. Premice (1926-2001), a phenomenal Haitian-American singer, dancer and actress, was nominated for a Tony Award for her role in the show. She was also the mother of writer/producer Susan Fales-Hill. Photo: Bettman/Corbis.

Lena Horne and Josephine Premice in a scene from the 1958 Broadway musical Jamaica. Ms. Premice (1926-2001), a phenomenal Haitian-American singer, dancer and actress, was nominated for a Tony Award for her role in the show. She was also the mother of writer/producer Susan Fales-Hill. Photo: Bettman/Corbis.

People tend to say the same two things about Dorothy Dandridge (“She was so beautiful!” “Her life was so tragic!”) Well, she was definitely beautiful (by most counts on the inside and out) and she did endure tough challenges in her life, but she was also a relentless hard worker. When she was not rehearsing for one of her nightclub performances, she was studying acting and dance and constantly working to create more opportunities for herself in Hollywood. At one point in the 1950s, she teamed up with Nat “King” Cole to pitch a television series where they would play a married couple (“small time” entertainers trying to catch a break in show business). It is our loss that they were turned down all over town (can you imagine watching clips of that today?!) In this photo, Ms. Dandridge is rehearsing with the great composer, arranger and vocal coach Phil Moore in March 1951. Mr. Moore also coached, arranged and/or wrote songs for Marilyn Monroe, Frank Sinatra, Lena Horne, Judy Garland, Pearl Bailey, Ava Gardner, Diahann Carroll, Johnny Mathis and The Supremes.

People tend to say the same two things about Dorothy Dandridge (“She was so beautiful!” “Her life was so tragic!”) Well, she was definitely beautiful (by most counts on the inside and out) and she did endure tough challenges in her life, but she was also a relentless hard worker. When she was not rehearsing for one of her nightclub performances, she was studying acting and dance and constantly working to create more opportunities for herself in Hollywood. At one point in the 1950s, she teamed up with Nat “King” Cole to pitch a television series where they would play a married couple (“small time” entertainers trying to catch a break in show business). It is our loss that they were turned down all over town (can you imagine watching clips of that today?!) In this photo, Ms. Dandridge is rehearsing with the great composer, arranger and vocal coach Phil Moore in March 1951. Mr. Moore also coached, arranged and/or wrote songs for Marilyn Monroe, Frank Sinatra, Lena Horne, Judy Garland, Pearl Bailey, Ava Gardner, Diahann Carroll, Johnny Mathis and The Supremes.

Dorothy Dandridge presenting the Oscar for Film Editing for “On the Waterfront” at the 27th Academy Awards at New York’s Century Theater on March 30, 1955. She was nominated for Best Actress that year for her role in “Carmen Jones”. 

Dear Mr. Harry Belafonte, Happy 87th Birthday! Thank you for more than 50 years of art and activism behind the scenes in Hollywood and on the frontlines of the civil rights movement. Thank you for speaking up early and often and creating Harbel Productions and producing projects like the film noir “Odds Against Tomorrow" in 1959 and the CBS television special written by Langston Hughes, “The Strollin’ 20’s”, a celebration of the Harlem Renaissance, in 1966. Thank you for still speaking up and enlightening us today. There was so much work to be done as you leaned against this Oscar statue at the Academy Awards on March 27, 1956, and you did it - and are still doing it! And for that sir, we thank you and wish you the happiest birthday and many more. Photo: Archive Photos/Getty Images.

Dear Mr. Harry Belafonte, Happy 87th Birthday! Thank you for more than 50 years of art and activism behind the scenes in Hollywood and on the frontlines of the civil rights movement. Thank you for speaking up early and often and creating Harbel Productions and producing projects like the film noir “Odds Against Tomorrow" in 1959 and the CBS television special written by Langston Hughes, “The Strollin’ 20’s”, a celebration of the Harlem Renaissance, in 1966. Thank you for still speaking up and enlightening us today. There was so much work to be done as you leaned against this Oscar statue at the Academy Awards on March 27, 1956, and you did it - and are still doing it! And for that sir, we thank you and wish you the happiest birthday and many more. Photo: Archive Photos/Getty Images.