Posts tagged "1940s"

I would like to extend Easter greetings to everyone celebrating today with this beautiful photograph of two women in Harlem on Easter Sunday 1947 by the legendary French photographer Henri Cartier-Bresson (1908-2004). My favorite fun fact about Mr. Cartier-Bresson is that he and Langston Hughes were roommates as young struggling artists in Mexico in the 1930s. Photo: Henri Cartier-Bresson/Magnum Photos.

Pearl Bailey was born 96 years ago today in Newport News, Virginia. As a late bloomer who has yet to finish her degree at NYU, my favorite fact about Ms. Bailey (shown here in 1946 by Carl Van Vechten) was that she earned a B.A. in Theology from Georgetown University in 1985 at the age of 67! Initially, she majored in French, but she switched to theology “Because it’s easier to know the Lord that it is to know French.” Photo: Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library

I really believe you are going to faint when you see the gorgeous photos I have of Margot Webb and her dance partner, Harold Norton, in Vintage Black Glamour. Their photos only tell part of their story. Their undeniable elegance turned out to be a blessing – and a curse for their career. You’ll read more about it in the book, but Ms. Webb herself told the dance scholar Brenda Dixon-Gottschild that dwindling opportunities solidified her decision to return to school. After her dance days were long gone, she earned a bachelor’s degree at Hunter College in 1940 and a master’s degree in education from Columbia University Teachers College in 1948.

Eartha Kitt stopping the trolley car in Istanbul with a pose (c.1949). This picture was shared via the Eartha Kitt fan page which is managed by Ms. Kitt’s daughter, Kitt Shapiro, owner of Simply Eartha If you would like to pre-order my book, go to this link - and thank you! http://vintageblackglamourbook.com/

Roland Hayes, the brilliant tenor (listen to his voice HERE!) who became the first African-American man to earn international fame as a concert vocalist, photographed by Addison Scurlock in 1940. Born to former slaves in Curryville, Georgia in 1887, he attended Fisk University and briefly toured with the Fisk Jubilee Singers. Early in his career, he was turned down by talent managers because he was Black so, he invested in himself: He raised money and arranged and financed his own concert performances,which included Negro spirituals, lieder and arias by Schubert, Tchaikovsky, and Mozart. In 1942, Mr. Hayes’s wife, Helen and daughter, Afrika, sat in a whites-only area of a shoe store and were thrown out of the store. When Mr. Hayes defended his family, he was beaten and he and his wife were arrested - and the governor of Georgia was absolutely fine with it. The incident inspired Langston Hughes to compose the poem, Roland Hayes Beaten. Mr. Hayes would later teach at Boston University and would go on to celebrate more than 50 years on the concert stage before his death in 1977.
PRE-ORDER FOR VINTAGE BLACK GLAMOUR (THE BOOK!) IS AVAILABLE NOW!http://vintageblackglamourbook.com/

Roland Hayes, the brilliant tenor (listen to his voice HERE!) who became the first African-American man to earn international fame as a concert vocalist, photographed by Addison Scurlock in 1940. Born to former slaves in Curryville, Georgia in 1887, he attended Fisk University and briefly toured with the Fisk Jubilee Singers. Early in his career, he was turned down by talent managers because he was Black so, he invested in himself: He raised money and arranged and financed his own concert performances,which included Negro spirituals, lieder and arias by Schubert, Tchaikovsky, and Mozart. In 1942, Mr. Hayes’s wife, Helen and daughter, Afrika, sat in a whites-only area of a shoe store and were thrown out of the store. When Mr. Hayes defended his family, he was beaten and he and his wife were arrested - and the governor of Georgia was absolutely fine with it. The incident inspired Langston Hughes to compose the poem, Roland Hayes Beaten. Mr. Hayes would later teach at Boston University and would go on to celebrate more than 50 years on the concert stage before his death in 1977.

PRE-ORDER FOR VINTAGE BLACK GLAMOUR (THE BOOK!) IS AVAILABLE NOW!http://vintageblackglamourbook.com/

The great Charles “Teenie” Harris took this photo of ladies club members “Debs About Town” in 1941 on a step outside of the University of Pittsburgh’s Falk School. Photo: Carnegie Museum of Art.

Actress and singer Sheila Guyse, best known for her role in the 1947 film “Sepia Cinderella,” died on December 28, 2013 in Honolulu, Hawaii at the age of 88. Ms. Guyse was born Etta Drucille Guyse on July 14, 1925, in Forest, Mississippi. After winning the amateur night competition at the Apollo Theater, she appeared in Broadway musicals like “Finian’s Rainbow” (1947) and “Lost in the Stars” (1949) along with several other film appearances including “Miracle In Harlem" in 1948. Photo: New York Times obituary.