Posts tagged "1930s"

Elisabeth Welch (1904-2003) the American singer who introduced the “Charleston” on Broadway before becoming a superstar in England, photographed by Carl Van Vechten on January 19, 1933. She was the first singer to popularize the classic Cole Porter tune, “Love for Sale” and it would become a signature song in her career. She also introduced “Stormy Weather” to British audiences and would be so beloved there, she remained for the rest of her life. Photo: Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library.

I really believe you are going to faint when you see the gorgeous photos I have of Margot Webb and her dance partner, Harold Norton, in Vintage Black Glamour. Their photos only tell part of their story. Their undeniable elegance turned out to be a blessing – and a curse for their career. You’ll read more about it in the book, but Ms. Webb herself told the dance scholar Brenda Dixon-Gottschild that dwindling opportunities solidified her decision to return to school. After her dance days were long gone, she earned a bachelor’s degree at Hunter College in 1940 and a master’s degree in education from Columbia University Teachers College in 1948.

Did you know that you can get a sneak peak at my new book? When you go to http://vintageblackglamourbook.com/ click the big red “Look Inside” button to get an idea of what you will be getting in June. This page features Princess Kouka of Sudan (Paul Robeson’s 1930s co-star) and the legendary dancer Jeni LeGon.

Roland Hayes, the brilliant tenor (listen to his voice HERE!) who became the first African-American man to earn international fame as a concert vocalist, photographed by Addison Scurlock in 1940. Born to former slaves in Curryville, Georgia in 1887, he attended Fisk University and briefly toured with the Fisk Jubilee Singers. Early in his career, he was turned down by talent managers because he was Black so, he invested in himself: He raised money and arranged and financed his own concert performances,which included Negro spirituals, lieder and arias by Schubert, Tchaikovsky, and Mozart. In 1942, Mr. Hayes’s wife, Helen and daughter, Afrika, sat in a whites-only area of a shoe store and were thrown out of the store. When Mr. Hayes defended his family, he was beaten and he and his wife were arrested - and the governor of Georgia was absolutely fine with it. The incident inspired Langston Hughes to compose the poem, Roland Hayes Beaten. Mr. Hayes would later teach at Boston University and would go on to celebrate more than 50 years on the concert stage before his death in 1977.
PRE-ORDER FOR VINTAGE BLACK GLAMOUR (THE BOOK!) IS AVAILABLE NOW!http://vintageblackglamourbook.com/

Roland Hayes, the brilliant tenor (listen to his voice HERE!) who became the first African-American man to earn international fame as a concert vocalist, photographed by Addison Scurlock in 1940. Born to former slaves in Curryville, Georgia in 1887, he attended Fisk University and briefly toured with the Fisk Jubilee Singers. Early in his career, he was turned down by talent managers because he was Black so, he invested in himself: He raised money and arranged and financed his own concert performances,which included Negro spirituals, lieder and arias by Schubert, Tchaikovsky, and Mozart. In 1942, Mr. Hayes’s wife, Helen and daughter, Afrika, sat in a whites-only area of a shoe store and were thrown out of the store. When Mr. Hayes defended his family, he was beaten and he and his wife were arrested - and the governor of Georgia was absolutely fine with it. The incident inspired Langston Hughes to compose the poem, Roland Hayes Beaten. Mr. Hayes would later teach at Boston University and would go on to celebrate more than 50 years on the concert stage before his death in 1977.

PRE-ORDER FOR VINTAGE BLACK GLAMOUR (THE BOOK!) IS AVAILABLE NOW!http://vintageblackglamourbook.com/

Charles “Tarzan” Cooper, shown circa 1939, was a member of the New York Rens basketball team - one of the first all-Black basketball teams in the United States. All-Black teams existed up until around 1950 when the NBA integrated their teams The New-York Historical Society is sponsoring a scholarship contest that was inspired by their upcoming exhibition on The Black Fives, which is about the history of early 20th-century African American basketball teams. Photo: The Black Fives Foundation/New York Historical Society.

Dr. Ralph Bunche (far right) with some of his friends at Harvard University, circa 1930. Dr. Bunche (1904-1971) was born in Detroit but raised in Albuquerque, New Mexico and Los Angeles, where he was valedictorian and graduated summa cum laude from UCLA. He earned a master’s degree in political science from Harvard in 1932 and taught at Howard University as he earned his doctorate from Harvard. Dr. Bunche played a critical role in the founding of the United Nations even as he maintained his duties as chair of the Political Science department at Howard, a position he held from 1928 to 1950. As Undersecretary General of the UN, his successful negotiation of four armistice agreements that ended the first Arab-Israeli war in 1949 led to him being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1950. He was the first African-American - and the first person of color anywhere in the world - to be awarded the prize. Photo: Los Angeles Public Library

"I learned that courage was not the absence of fear, but the triumph over it. The brave man is not he who does not feel afraid, but he who conquers that fear." ~ Nelson Mandela. Rest in peace, Madiba. Photo: Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture.

"I learned that courage was not the absence of fear, but the triumph over it. The brave man is not he who does not feel afraid, but he who conquers that fear." ~ Nelson Mandela. Rest in peace, Madiba. Photo: Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture.