Posts tagged "1930s"

My father, Erskine Butterfield, was a musician in Newark, NJ during the 1930s-1950s. He is credited with helping to create what is known as “Cocktail Music.” He had his own weekly radio program atop Bamberger’s Department Store in downtown Newark at WOR radio. One of his guests was a then unknown singer, Miss Lena Horne. He also recorded for the Decca and New Brunswick labels, and was a protege of Willie “The Lion Smith”, because he had a strong left hand; he played and composed Boogie Woogie music.”

I am so pleased and impressed with the submissions to #myVBG! We have beautiful mothers, grandmothers, aunts, family friends and fathers like Jacqueline Butterfield’s father, Erskine Butterfield. Jacqueline’s note and photo of her dad on #myVBG made my “Nichelle’s Picks” page.

I would love to see your family and friends on on #myVBG. Upload your photos at http://myvbg.com/ with her name, city, date/location of photo, a fun VBG-ish fact about her with #myVBG and #vbgbook. I am selecting a few pictures on the “Nichelle’s Picks” page but really, every submission is my “favorite.” Thank you!

Circus dancers, 1930s. 

(via lascasartoris)

I am excited to announce Vintage Black Glamour’s fan site #myVBG! It was created so we can see and properly admire the VBG icons in YOUR life! I want to see women in your family like your grandmother who may remind you of Lena Horne or Diahann Carroll; a favorite diva aunt with the zest of a Josephine Baker or Gladys Bentley; a mother who brings to mind the heady brilliance of a Dr. Maya Angelou or Ruby Dee. The first three pictures are already up, my mother, grandmother and the beautiful lady picture here, my late great-grandmother Nellie Parson Swilley, my beloved “Mama Nell” in the 1940s. She was so lovely and sharp that a lady tried to buy the hat off of her head after church one day. This is not some family legend - I was actually standing there and watching in amazement at Sandy Mount Baptist Church in Smithfield,Virginia as this lady tried to buy her hat!) Mama Nell also taught me how to cook – and called me Sugarlump.I would be honored to have you share the divas in your family here for the world to see. 
Upload your photos at http://myvbg.com/ and tell us a brief story about her name, city, date and location of photo, a fun VBG-ish fact about her and tag me on Twitter (@VintageBlkGlam) or here on Tumblr with the hashtag #myVBG and#vbgbook. Thank you – I can’t wait to see your #myVBG!

I am excited to announce Vintage Black Glamour’s fan site #myVBG! It was created so we can see and properly admire the VBG icons in YOUR life! I want to see women in your family like your grandmother who may remind you of Lena Horne or Diahann Carroll; a favorite diva aunt with the zest of a Josephine Baker or Gladys Bentley; a mother who brings to mind the heady brilliance of a Dr. Maya Angelou or Ruby Dee. The first three pictures are already up, my mother, grandmother and the beautiful lady picture here, my late great-grandmother Nellie Parson Swilley, my beloved “Mama Nell” in the 1940s. She was so lovely and sharp that a lady tried to buy the hat off of her head after church one day. This is not some family legend - I was actually standing there and watching in amazement at Sandy Mount Baptist Church in Smithfield,Virginia as this lady tried to buy her hat!) Mama Nell also taught me how to cook – and called me Sugarlump.

I would be honored to have you share the divas in your family here for the world to see.

Upload your photos at http://myvbg.com/ and tell us a brief story about her name, city, date and location of photo, a fun VBG-ish fact about her and tag me on Twitter (@VintageBlkGlam) or here on Tumblr with the hashtag #myVBG and#vbgbook. Thank you – I can’t wait to see your #myVBG!

Elisabeth Welch (1904-2003) the American singer who introduced the “Charleston” on Broadway before becoming a superstar in England, photographed by Carl Van Vechten on January 19, 1933. She was the first singer to popularize the classic Cole Porter tune, “Love for Sale” and it would become a signature song in her career. She also introduced “Stormy Weather” to British audiences and would be so beloved there, she remained for the rest of her life. Photo: Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library.

I really believe you are going to faint when you see the gorgeous photos I have of Margot Webb and her dance partner, Harold Norton, in Vintage Black Glamour. Their photos only tell part of their story. Their undeniable elegance turned out to be a blessing – and a curse for their career. You’ll read more about it in the book, but Ms. Webb herself told the dance scholar Brenda Dixon-Gottschild that dwindling opportunities solidified her decision to return to school. After her dance days were long gone, she earned a bachelor’s degree at Hunter College in 1940 and a master’s degree in education from Columbia University Teachers College in 1948.

Did you know that you can get a sneak peak at my new book? When you go to http://vintageblackglamourbook.com/ click the big red “Look Inside” button to get an idea of what you will be getting in June. This page features Princess Kouka of Sudan (Paul Robeson’s 1930s co-star) and the legendary dancer Jeni LeGon.

Roland Hayes, the brilliant tenor (listen to his voice HERE!) who became the first African-American man to earn international fame as a concert vocalist, photographed by Addison Scurlock in 1940. Born to former slaves in Curryville, Georgia in 1887, he attended Fisk University and briefly toured with the Fisk Jubilee Singers. Early in his career, he was turned down by talent managers because he was Black so, he invested in himself: He raised money and arranged and financed his own concert performances,which included Negro spirituals, lieder and arias by Schubert, Tchaikovsky, and Mozart. In 1942, Mr. Hayes’s wife, Helen and daughter, Afrika, sat in a whites-only area of a shoe store and were thrown out of the store. When Mr. Hayes defended his family, he was beaten and he and his wife were arrested - and the governor of Georgia was absolutely fine with it. The incident inspired Langston Hughes to compose the poem, Roland Hayes Beaten. Mr. Hayes would later teach at Boston University and would go on to celebrate more than 50 years on the concert stage before his death in 1977.
PRE-ORDER FOR VINTAGE BLACK GLAMOUR (THE BOOK!) IS AVAILABLE NOW!http://vintageblackglamourbook.com/

Roland Hayes, the brilliant tenor (listen to his voice HERE!) who became the first African-American man to earn international fame as a concert vocalist, photographed by Addison Scurlock in 1940. Born to former slaves in Curryville, Georgia in 1887, he attended Fisk University and briefly toured with the Fisk Jubilee Singers. Early in his career, he was turned down by talent managers because he was Black so, he invested in himself: He raised money and arranged and financed his own concert performances,which included Negro spirituals, lieder and arias by Schubert, Tchaikovsky, and Mozart. In 1942, Mr. Hayes’s wife, Helen and daughter, Afrika, sat in a whites-only area of a shoe store and were thrown out of the store. When Mr. Hayes defended his family, he was beaten and he and his wife were arrested - and the governor of Georgia was absolutely fine with it. The incident inspired Langston Hughes to compose the poem, Roland Hayes Beaten. Mr. Hayes would later teach at Boston University and would go on to celebrate more than 50 years on the concert stage before his death in 1977.

PRE-ORDER FOR VINTAGE BLACK GLAMOUR (THE BOOK!) IS AVAILABLE NOW!http://vintageblackglamourbook.com/