Happy Father’s Day! This is Sammy Davis Jr. and his son Mark in 1964. Photo: Leonard McCombe/Time-Life Pictures.

Dance icon Katherine Dunham with two of her dancers and actor and singer Tony Martin in the 1948 film, “Casbah.” The film was about a group of jewel thieves led by Mr. Martin’s “Pepe Le Moko” in Algiers. Bonus trivia: Mr. Martin was married to the legendary dancer Cyd Charrisse for 60 years and none other than Eartha Kitt made her film debut here - she was one of Ms. Dunham’s dancers. Photo: Missouri Historical Society via The Library of Congress.

Composer, Producer, Singer and pianist Patrice Rushen in the early 1980s, photographed by Bobby Holland. A child prodigy and classically trained pianist, the 1976 University of Southern California graduate is best known for her hit songs (all of which she wrote or co-wrote) “Forget Me Nots” “Haven’t You Heard,” and “Remind Me” and yes, her beautiful headful of braids! All of these songs and many others have been sampled countless times, most notably by Will Smith (“Men In Black”) and Mary J. Blige’s “You Remind Me”, which is based on “Remind Me.” According to her official website, Ms. Rushen receives about thirty requests every week to sample her music. Beyond her own stellar music career, Ms. Rushen has broken many barriers behind the scenes. She was the first woman to serve as Musical Director for the Grammy Awards, the Emmy Awards, the NAACP Image Awards and the People’s Choice Awards. She was also the Musical Director for Janet Jackson’s “janet.” Tour. Ms. Rushen has also composed many musical scores for film and television including “The Women of Brewster Place,” “Ruby Bridges,” and the theme song for “The Steve Harvey Show” (the sitcom, not his current talk show). Ms. Rushen has said that she has modeled her career after her friend and mentor Quincy Jones and she has recorded with him and many other musical legends like Prince, Minnie Riperton, Al Jarreau, George Benson, Chaka Khan, Carlos Santana and more. In 2005, she received an honorary doctor of music degree from Berklee College of Music in Boston and in 2008, she accepted the newly created position of Ambassador for Artistry in Education at the school. Ms. Rushen is still composing and performing today and also works with several organizations that focus on music education programs for inner-city youth. Photo: Bobby Holland/Michael Ochs Archives.

Composer, Producer, Singer and pianist Patrice Rushen in the early 1980s, photographed by Bobby Holland. A child prodigy and classically trained pianist, the 1976 University of Southern California graduate is best known for her hit songs (all of which she wrote or co-wrote) “Forget Me Nots” “Haven’t You Heard,” and “Remind Me” and yes, her beautiful headful of braids! All of these songs and many others have been sampled countless times, most notably by Will Smith (“Men In Black”) and Mary J. Blige’s “You Remind Me”, which is based on “Remind Me.” According to her official website, Ms. Rushen receives about thirty requests every week to sample her music. Beyond her own stellar music career, Ms. Rushen has broken many barriers behind the scenes. She was the first woman to serve as Musical Director for the Grammy Awards, the Emmy Awards, the NAACP Image Awards and the People’s Choice Awards. She was also the Musical Director for Janet Jackson’s “janet.” Tour. Ms. Rushen has also composed many musical scores for film and television including “The Women of Brewster Place,” “Ruby Bridges,” and the theme song for “The Steve Harvey Show” (the sitcom, not his current talk show). Ms. Rushen has said that she has modeled her career after her friend and mentor Quincy Jones and she has recorded with him and many other musical legends like Prince, Minnie Riperton, Al Jarreau, George Benson, Chaka Khan, Carlos Santana and more. In 2005, she received an honorary doctor of music degree from Berklee College of Music in Boston and in 2008, she accepted the newly created position of Ambassador for Artistry in Education at the school. Ms. Rushen is still composing and performing today and also works with several organizations that focus on music education programs for inner-city youth. Photo: Bobby Holland/Michael Ochs Archives.

Theresa Harris with Barbara Stanwyck in the 1933 pre-code film, “Baby Face.” Ms. Harris (1909-1985) played a series of maids to nearly every major Hollywood star of the time from Bette Davis and Jean Harlow to Ginger Rogers and Esther Williams. In “Baby Face,” Ms. Stanwyck (1907-1990) played Lily Powers, an ambitious golddigger who later questions her ways (A little bit… Hollywood censors did some tweaking…). Ms. Harris played her best friend and “maid” Chico, who is with her every step of the way as she climbs the ladder of success, one man (or two) at a time. Ms. Harris also was the inspiration behind Lynn Nottage's play, “By the Way, Meet Vera Stark.” I never post about Theresa Harris without including the haunting quote from her I found in Donald Bogle’s book, “Bright Boulevards, Bold Dreams: The Story of Black Hollywood. Bogle described her as “both outspoken and highly intelligent” and noted that she “didn’t mince words about the plight of colored actresses. She told Fay M. Jackson, of the California Eagle in August 1937: “I never felt the chance to rise above the role of maid in Hollywood movies. My color was against me. The fact that I was not ‘hot’ stamped me as either an uppity ‘Negress’ or relegated me to the eternal role of stooge or servant. I can sing but so can hundreds of other girls. My ambitions are to be an actress. Hollywood had no parts for me.” Ms. Harris would later tell the same reporter that she enjoyed working in race movies “because In the picture I have the chance of wearing clothes.” “Clothes” as a gorgeous wardrobe that Black women usually never had a chance to wear in white movies. Photo: Warner Brothers/Photofest.

Theresa Harris with Barbara Stanwyck in the 1933 pre-code film, “Baby Face.” Ms. Harris (1909-1985) played a series of maids to nearly every major Hollywood star of the time from Bette Davis and Jean Harlow to Ginger Rogers and Esther Williams. In “Baby Face,” Ms. Stanwyck (1907-1990) played Lily Powers, an ambitious golddigger who later questions her ways (A little bit… Hollywood censors did some tweaking…). Ms. Harris played her best friend and “maid” Chico, who is with her every step of the way as she climbs the ladder of success, one man (or two) at a time. Ms. Harris also was the inspiration behind Lynn Nottage's play, “By the Way, Meet Vera Stark.” I never post about Theresa Harris without including the haunting quote from her I found in Donald Bogle’s book, “Bright Boulevards, Bold Dreams: The Story of Black Hollywood. Bogle described her as “both outspoken and highly intelligent” and noted that she “didn’t mince words about the plight of colored actresses. She told Fay M. Jackson, of the California Eagle in August 1937: “I never felt the chance to rise above the role of maid in Hollywood movies. My color was against me. The fact that I was not ‘hot’ stamped me as either an uppity ‘Negress’ or relegated me to the eternal role of stooge or servant. I can sing but so can hundreds of other girls. My ambitions are to be an actress. Hollywood had no parts for me.” Ms. Harris would later tell the same reporter that she enjoyed working in race movies “because In the picture I have the chance of wearing clothes.” “Clothes” as a gorgeous wardrobe that Black women usually never had a chance to wear in white movies. Photo: Warner Brothers/Photofest.

Nichelle Nichols presiding over a high-stakes crap game in the 1966 film, Mister Buddwing. Photo by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer/Getty Images.

Nichelle Nichols presiding over a high-stakes crap game in the 1966 film, Mister Buddwing. Photo by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer/Getty Images.

Happy 55th Birthday Prince! In this photo, he is performing in Chicago in 1984, right around the time he was making regular appearances on the wall of my teenage bedroom. ;) Photo: Richard E. Aaron/The Hell Gate/Corbis.

Happy 55th Birthday Prince! In this photo, he is performing in Chicago in 1984, right around the time he was making regular appearances on the wall of my teenage bedroom. ;) Photo: Richard E. Aaron/The Hell Gate/Corbis.

The Supremes, Diana Ross, Florence Ballard and Mary Wilson during one of their wardrobe fittings in the 1960s.

The SupremesDiana Ross, Florence Ballard and Mary Wilson during one of their wardrobe fittings in the 1960s.